And I can’t believe we’re still talking about abortion in 2017

The Women's March attracts hundreds of thousands; there may have been as many reasons why they came


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  • Photo by Becca Tucker The march was peaceful, but pointed.




  • Photo by Becca Tucker Another example of the protest signs at Saturday's Women's March.




  • Photo by Becca Tucker Here's another example of the protest signs at Saturday's Women's March in the District of Columbia.




  • Photo by Becca Tucker The Women's March brought together many constituencies.



By Becca Tucker

— More than half a million people flooded the streets for the Women’s March on Washington the day after the presidential inauguration, news reports estimate.

The colorfully clad, pink-hatted masses thronging the streets righted the vibes that, in one marcher’s words, had felt all wrong the day before.

Alice Crary, a philosophy professor at the New School for Social Research in New York, pushed her younger daughter in a stroller topped by a sign that said, “Because: Everything.”

It was an answer to the implicit question – why are you marching?

There were too many answers for Crary to fit on one sign.

“I’m overwhelmed today,” she said. “I’m a gender studies professor, that’s would be one” reason. “God knows, the environment. Black Lives Matter. Our Constitution.”

Then the crowd pushed her along.

In the 70s, 'women were not as bold'Mary Williams, 60, of Oregon, ambled along on her walker, her oversized umbrella displaying a giant hand, middle finger extended.

Williams is not physically well, but far from deterring her from making the trip, her disability was half the reason she was here.

“I’m upset because he’s really openly mocked people with disabilities,” she said.

Having protested the Vietnam War, she said this was “much bigger, much bolder for the women. The women were not as bold the last time I marched in the 70s. We were still trying to be nice then.”

Did she have a message?

She pointed to her umbrella. “It really expresses my sentiments entirely,” she said.

'I can’t believe we’re still talking about abortion in 2017'John Reed of Katonah held high his message designed, like many (Free Melania, We Shall Over-comb), to get a therapeutic laugh:

“I know signs. I make the best signs. They’re terrific. Everyone agrees.”

He couldn’t take credit; his son, Sawyer, 13, had penned it. The family had marched together in Katonah after the election. This was Sawyer’s second protest.

Michele Charles, 44, of Brooklyn, held a sign that read: “If you don’t like abortion don’t have one.”

She was here, she said, because of “everyone else. I just love the womanhood, the peace. And I can’t believe we’re still talking about abortion in 2017.”




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